Discussion:
Vim Bindings?
(too old to reply)
d***@gmail.com
2019-06-18 12:55:31 UTC
Permalink
Hi!

At my workplace I'm supposed to use TDI (or SDI). However, I'm having a hard time to code in this thing since I've been using vim for years and am quite used to th e key layout. I saw that there exists an 'emacs' keybinding scheme, but none for vim? It appears that TDI is based on eclipse, is it possible to install eclipse plugins?

Also, if I want to write code for an hook and click on 'open in external editor' this starts notepad. Is there a way to change this? I aleady tried to fiddle around with the file ending associations, but to no avail.

Thank you for reading this.

Best
j***@gmail.com
2019-06-19 04:03:04 UTC
Permalink
It is possible to install eclipse plugins in SDI. You find that option
under 'Help->Install new Software'. Please be aware that SDI is using
an old Eclipse version, Juno, and your plugin needs to be able to
work with that Eclipse version.

You can change the external editor by opening Window->Preferences.
Under 'Security Directory Integrator Preferences' you will find 'External editor'.
Choose a GUI editor that opens a new window, I guess you want gvim,
if you have that installed.
Do not choose an editor that expects to run in the
console window, since while using the external editor TDI will
basically freeze waiting for the editor to finish, and
a console based editor will wait for input that will never come.
I don't know how vim works on Windows, but at least on Linux,
vim runs in the console window.
d***@gmail.com
2019-06-19 06:28:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@gmail.com
It is possible to install eclipse plugins in SDI. You find that option
under 'Help->Install new Software'. Please be aware that SDI is using
an old Eclipse version, Juno, and your plugin needs to be able to
work with that Eclipse version.
You can change the external editor by opening Window->Preferences.
Under 'Security Directory Integrator Preferences' you will find 'External editor'.
Choose a GUI editor that opens a new window, I guess you want gvim,
if you have that installed.
Do not choose an editor that expects to run in the
console window, since while using the external editor TDI will
basically freeze waiting for the editor to finish, and
a console based editor will wait for input that will never come.
I don't know how vim works on Windows, but at least on Linux,
vim runs in the console window.
Thank you very much for your really helpful answer!
Franzw
2019-06-19 07:20:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
It is possible to install eclipse plugins in SDI. You find that option
under 'Help->Install new Software'. Please be aware that SDI is using
an old Eclipse version, Juno, and your plugin needs to be able to
work with that Eclipse version.
You can change the external editor by opening Window->Preferences.
Under 'Security Directory Integrator Preferences' you will find 'External editor'.
Choose a GUI editor that opens a new window, I guess you want gvim,
if you have that installed.
Do not choose an editor that expects to run in the
console window, since while using the external editor TDI will
basically freeze waiting for the editor to finish, and
a console based editor will wait for input that will never come.
I don't know how vim works on Windows, but at least on Linux,
vim runs in the console window.
Thank you very much for your really helpful answer!
This reminds about a story I heard back in the '90s - A German developer was a real vi wizard - so when he coded he changed his keyboard settings from German to US keyboard because vi is optimized for reducing hand movements - so he had actually learned the US keyboard layout (blind typing) when programming :-)

I would be interested what you end up with - please keep us TDI/SDI aficionados oriented :-)

And welcome to TDI land - be aware TDI is not a programming IDE - it is a scripting/run TLE tool - basically a Powershell clone with a very nice and rich UI (although Powershell is much younger than TDI...)

Regards
Franz Wolfhagen
d***@gmail.com
2019-06-19 07:54:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Franzw
Post by d***@gmail.com
Post by j***@gmail.com
It is possible to install eclipse plugins in SDI. You find that option
under 'Help->Install new Software'. Please be aware that SDI is using
an old Eclipse version, Juno, and your plugin needs to be able to
work with that Eclipse version.
You can change the external editor by opening Window->Preferences.
Under 'Security Directory Integrator Preferences' you will find 'External editor'.
Choose a GUI editor that opens a new window, I guess you want gvim,
if you have that installed.
Do not choose an editor that expects to run in the
console window, since while using the external editor TDI will
basically freeze waiting for the editor to finish, and
a console based editor will wait for input that will never come.
I don't know how vim works on Windows, but at least on Linux,
vim runs in the console window.
Thank you very much for your really helpful answer!
This reminds about a story I heard back in the '90s - A German developer was a real vi wizard - so when he coded he changed his keyboard settings from German to US keyboard because vi is optimized for reducing hand movements - so he had actually learned the US keyboard layout (blind typing) when programming :-)
I would be interested what you end up with - please keep us TDI/SDI aficionados oriented :-)
And welcome to TDI land - be aware TDI is not a programming IDE - it is a scripting/run TLE tool - basically a Powershell clone with a very nice and rich UI (although Powershell is much younger than TDI...)
Regards
Franz Wolfhagen
Even though I do not consider myself a 'vi wizard' by any means, as a matter of fact I am using the US layout for years as well. I do not sympathize for the Imperial measurement system and believe that the metric system is better in every way, but the keyboard layout they got right in my opinion. The fact alone that the letters ;/{} and () are reachable easily with the right hand without any special keys other than Shift (for ;/ not even that) is worth tons of gold.

Of course operating systems and programming languages evolved around the English language, so it's clear that the US keyboard is better suited for everything 'IT'. But still, I can recommend learning the US layout to every Sysadmin and Programmer, makes life a little bit easier.
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